Mustard 21 Canada Inc. mustard crop in bloom
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Mustard Varieties

 

Canadian Mustard Varieties and Their Dates of Registration if Available

Yellow (White) Mustard
Sinapis alba (L.)
(= Brassica hirta)
Oriental Mustard
Brassica juncea (L.)
Brown (Indian) Mustard
Brassica juncea (L.)
  • AAC Adagio – 2014
  • Andante – 2002
  • AC Base – 1998
  • AC Pennant – 1994
  • Ochre – 1981
  • Ace
  • Gisilba
  • Tilney
  • Viscount
  • AAC Oriental 200 – 2015
  • Acanto – 2009
  • AC Vulcan – 1994
  • Cutlass – 1985
  • Domo – 1977
  • Lethbridge 22A – 1974
  • Forge
  • AAC Brown 18 (Hybrid) – 2018
  • AAC Brown 120 – 2017
  • Amigo – 2008
  • Centennial Brown – 2005
  • Duchess

Yellow Mustards

AAC Adagio is a product of the mustard breeding team of the AAFC Saskatoon Research Centre. It is a yellow mustard with the high mucilage trait, desirable to processors, introduced from brown-seeded lines. AAC Adagio is well adapted to all mustard growing regions of western Canada.

See the full variety description here

Andante, since its registration in 2002, has become the predominant condiment yellow mustard cultivar in western Canada because of its Increased grain yield and superior seed quality. Well adapted to the mustard growing areas of the Canadian prairies, Adante represented a significant improvement in seed mucilage content. This variety is a product of the breeding program of Dr. Gerhard Rakow (AAFC) and is used as the check variety for comparisons with prospective new varieties.

See the full variety description here

AC BASE was registered in 1998, a variety from the breeding program of Dr. Gerhard Rakow (AAFC). It had higher grain yield and similar maturity and plant height compared to the check variety, Ochre. It had a darker yellow colour and lower protein than Ochre. It is well adapted to the mustard growing areas of the Canadian prairies.

See the full variety description here

AC Pennant, registered in 1994, from the breeding program of Dr. Gerhard Rakow (AAFC), has been the official check cultivar since 2002. It is well adapted to the mustard growing areas of the Canadian prairies. Characteristics include improved seed mucilage and grain yield compared to then check, Ochre.

See the full variety description here

Ochre – research is ongoing; description to follow.

Ace – research is ongoing; description to follow.

Gisilba – research is ongoing; description to follow.

Tilney – research is ongoing; description to follow.

Viscount – research is ongoing; description to follow.


Oriental Mustards

AAC Oriental 200 has a higher (7%) yield than the check cultivar Cutlass and similar levels of blackleg and white rust resistance. It is well adapted to all mustard growing areas of western Canada. Dr. Bifang Cheng developed this variety.

See the full variety description here

AC Vulcan was selected from Cutlass, and like it, is highly resistant to blackleg disease. AC Vulcan shows improvement over Cutlass through greater yield, increased seed weight, higher allyl glucosinolate, reduced fixed oil content and brighter yellow seed. It is resistant to white rust race 2a, though susceptible to race 2v.

See the full variety description here

Acanto is the first zero erucic acid content oriental condiment mustard registered in Canada. Similar in other qualities such as yield, height, seed weight and protein content, seed chlorophyll content to the check, Cutlass, it is highly resistant to blackleg but more susceptible to white rust race 2v than Cutlass. Acanto is well adapted to the mustard growing areas of the Canadian prairies.

See the full variety description here

Cutlass was developed by Dr. Don Woods (AAFC) with reduced fixed oil content, while maintaining or improving other attributes. It was highly resistant to blackleg and was resistant to white rust race 2a. It was registered in 1985, became the check cultivar in 1988 and held that ranking for 20 years.

See the full variety description here

Forge was the predominant oriental mustard grown in western Canada when Cutlass and AC Vulcan were developed. It was resistant to blackleg, but highly susceptible to white rust races 2a and 2v. Forge was developed by Mr. John Hemingway of Colman’s Food, Norwich, UK.

Referenced in Rakow, G. & Rode, D. 2009. Can. J. Plant Sci. 89:325-329.

Domo was developed by Mr. Sid Pawlowski (AAFC), and was registered in 1977. It was higher yielding that Lethbridge 22 A, had higher allyl glucosinolate content and 1% higher fixed oil content that Lethbridge 22A.

[Agriculture Canada 1977. Description of oriental mustard (Brassica juncea (L.) Czern.) variety Domo. 1977, April 19. Production Marketing Branch, Plant Products Division, Ottawa, Ontario. Referenced in Rakow, G. & Rode, D. 2009. Can. J. Plant Sci. 89:325-329.]

Referenced in Rakow, G. & Rode, D. 2009. Can. J. Plant Sci. 89:325-329.

Lethbridge 22A was developed by Mr. Sid Pawlowski (AAFC), and was registered in 1974. It was the first true yellow breeding oriental mustard cultivar.
[Agriculture Canada 1974. Description of oriental mustard (Brassica juncea (L.) Czern.) variety Lethbridge 22 A. 1974, Aug. 21. Production Marketing Branch, Plant Products Division, Ottawa, Ontario. Referenced in Rakow, G. & Rode, D. 2009. Can. J. Plant Sci. 89:325-329.]

Referenced in Rakow, G. & Rode, D. 2009. Can. J. Plant Sci. 89:325-329.


Brown Mustards

AAC Brown 18 is the first Canadian condiment mustard hybrid. It demonstrates enhanced seedling vigour and superior yields. AAC Brown 18 was developed by Dr. Bifang Cheng (AAFC) and is licensed to Mustard 21 Canada for commercialization; commercial launch is scheduled for 2020.

AAC Brown 120 is not available commercially. It is an open pollinated line developed by Dr. Bifang Cheng (AAFC).

See the full variety description here

Amigo brown condiment mustard is from the breeding program of Dr. Gerhard Rakow (AAFC). Amigo is characterized by lower fixed oil content and greater seed protein. Resistance to white rust race 2a from AC Vulcan was bred into Amigo.

See the full variety description here

Centennial Brown brown condiment mustard is well adapted to the mustard growing regions of the Canadian prairies. Compared to the check, Common Brown, yield was increase by 3% and height increase by 5 cm. Glucosinolate is higher, as is protein content, compared to Common Brown. Fixed oil was reduced as were green seed counts. This variety is resistant to blackleg and highly susceptible to white rust. Centennial Brown, registered in 2005, is used as the check variety for comparisons with prospective new varieties.

See the full variety description here

Duchess became the check variety after 2005. – research is ongoing; description to follow.

Common Brown – research is ongoing; description to follow.

site updated: 6-jul-19